The Town of Darrington

2021 Annual Consumer Confidence Drinking Water Report

May 1, 2022

The Water We Drink

We’re pleased to present to you this year’s Annual Consumer Confidence Drinking Water Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and the services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water and are committed to ensuring the quality of your water.  

I’m pleased to report that your drinking water is SAFE and meets or exceeds all State and Federal requirements.

The Darrington water system currently serves approximately 600+ residential and commercial connections. The Town does not treat the water, nor do we introduce any additives. Your water comes from two drilled municipal wells sunk approximately 200+ feet into an underground source of water call the Sauk River Aquifer. The average water level is 91 feet below the surface. These wells are located on the south side of Town at the Darrington School complex. The Town owns the land around these wells and restricts any activity that may impact the quality of the water. The Town has two reservoir tanks with the total capacity of 490,000.00 gallons of water. These reservoir tanks are located at the far west and far south sides of town.

All sources of drinking water are subject to potential contamination by substances that are naturally occurring or man-made. These substances can be microbes, inorganic or organic chemicals and radioactive substances. All drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminates. It is important to remember that the presence of these contaminates does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by a public water system. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Town of Darrington is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to two minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminates in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for infection. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

To further our compliance with Washington State Department of Health regulations, the Town Council authorized the creation of a “Cross Contamination” program. You may have heard the terms “cross connection” or “backflow”. What is a “cross connection”? It is a permanent or temporary piping arrangement which can allow your drinking water to be contaminated if a backflow condition occurs. What is “backflow”? It’s just what it sounds like: the water is flowing in the opposite direction from its normal flow. With the direction of flow reversed, due to a change in pressures, backflow can allow contaminates to enter our drinking water system through cross connections. Back siphonage may occur due to a loss of pressure in the water distribution system during a high withdrawal of water for fire protection or a shutdown of a water main or plumbing system for repair. Common household hazards are underground lawn irrigation systems, water held in pools or ponds with a hose submerged that can act as a conduit for contaminates under backflow conditions. Another concern is your hot water heater. In addition to making certain that you have a temperature & pressure relief valve on your tank to avoid explosions, excess pressure may force water from your tank back into our public water system. Below, you will see an example of an inexpensive hose connector, that can be purchased at any hardware store, and will prevent contaminates form being siphoned back into the water supply. A good cross connection program is just one more tool to insure safe and healthy drinking water for you and your family.  

In the following table you find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you understand these terms we’ve provided the following definitions:

Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.

Action Level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant, which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements, which a water system must follow.

Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet an MCL or a treatment technique under certain conditions.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) – the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) – the level of a contaminant in drinking water below, which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safely.

Parts per Million (PPM) or Milligrams per Liter (MG/L) – one part per million (corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000).

Parts per Billion (PPB) or Micrograms per Liter (UG/L) – one part per billion (corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000).

Parts per Trillion (PPT) or Nanograms per Liter (NANOGRAMS/L) – one part per trillion (corresponds to one minute in 2,000,000 years or a single penny in $10,000,000,000).

Parts per Quadrillion (PPQ) or Picograms per Liter (PICOGRAMS/L) – one part per quadrillion (corresponds to one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or on penny in $10,000,000,000,000).

Picocuries per Liter (p CI/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

Millirems per Year (MREM/YR) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.

Million Fibers per Liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers that are longer than 10 micrometers.

Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of water. (Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.

The Town of Darrington routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to State and Federal laws. The Town tests twice per month for coliform bacteria. Tests for Lead and Copper, Organic Compounds and Herbicides are tested as determined by the Washington State Department of Health, from the following table.

                Teat Panel/Analyte                                    Last Sample Date                      Next Sample Date

                Lead and Copper                                      2/24/2022                                 July 2025

                Asbestos                                                   10/24/1995                               waiver/not required.

                Nitrate                                                      2/24/2022                                 April 2023

                Complete Inorganic                                  2/24/2022                                 March 2031

                Volatile Organics                                      3/07/2019                                 March 2025

                Herbicides                                                2/24/2022                                 March 2031

                Pesticides                                                 2/24/2022                                 waiver/ March 2025

                Soil Fumigants                                         5/12/2016                                 waiver / March 2025

                Gross Alpha                                             2/24/2022                                 May 2028

                Radium 228                                              2/24/2022                                 May 2028

The following table shows the results of our monitoring for the period March 2021 to March of 2022, for Nitrates and March 2021 to March 2022 for State Regulated Volatile Organic Compounds. The presence of these contaminants in the water does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. The state requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentration of these contaminates are not expected to vary significantly from year to year.

Test Results: Organic & Inorganic Compounds
EPA Regulated Inorganic Compounds
Date Samples Taken: 2/24/2022Date of Report: 3/28/2022
ContaminantUnit MeasurementMCLGMCLLevel DetectedViolation Y- yes N – noLikely Source of Contamination
       
Well 1Nitrate -Nmg/L10100.31NRunoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage, erosion of natural deposits
Well 2Nitrate -Nmg/L10100.34NRunoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage, erosion of natural deposits
EPA/ State Regulated Volatile Organic Compounds
Date Samples Taken: 2/24/2022Date of Report: 3/28/2022
ContaminantUnit MeasurementMCLGMCLLevel DetectedViolation Y- yes N – noLikely Source of Contamination
Well 1ARSENICmg/L .010NDNerosion of natural deposits: run off from orchards; runoff from glass & electronics production waste
Well 2ARSENICmg/L .010NDNerosion of natural deposits: run off from orchards; runoff from glass & electronics production waste
Well 1BARIUMmg/L0.01152 NDischarge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits
Well 2BARIUMmg/L0.01702 NDischarge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits
Well 1CADMIUMmg/L .005NDNCorrosion of galvanized pipes; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from metal refineries; runoff from waste batteries and paints
Well 2CADMIUMmg/L .005NDNCorrosion of galvanized pipes; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from metal refineries; runoff from waste batteries and paints
Well 1CHROMIUMmg/LND.01 NDischarge from steel and pulp mills; erosion of natural deposits
Well 2CHROMIUMmg/L0.0011.01 NDischarge from steel and pulp mills; erosion of natural deposits
Well 1MERCURYmg/L .002NDNErosion of natural deposits; discharge from refineries and factories; runoff from landfills and croplands
Well 2MERCURYmg/L .002NDNErosion of natural deposits; discharge from refineries and factories; runoff from landfills and croplands
Well 1SELENIUMmg/L .05NDNDischarge from petroleum and metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from mines
Well 2SELEMIUMmg/L .05NDNDischarge from petroleum and metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from mines
Well 1BERYLLIUMmg/L .004NDNDischarge from metal refineries and coal-burning factories; discharge from electrical, aerospace and defense industries
Well 2BERYLLIUMmg/L .004NDNDischarge from metal refineries and coal-burning factories; discharge from electrical, aerospace and defense industries
Well 1NICKELmg/L .1NDN 
Well 2NICKELmg/L .1NDN 
Well 1ANTIMONYmg/L .006NDNDischarge from petroleum refineries; fire retardants; ceramics; electronics; solder
Well 2ANTIMONYmg/L .006NDNDischarge from petroleum refineries; fire retardants; ceramics; electronics; solder
Well 1THALLIUMmg/L .002NDNLeaching from ore-processing sites; discharge from electronics, glass, and drug factories
Well 2THALLIUMmg/L .002NDNLeaching from ore-processing sites; discharge from electronics, glass, and drug factories
Well 1CYANIDE, AVAILABLEmg/L .2NDNDischarge from steel/metal factories; discharge from plastic and fertilizer factories
Well 2CYANIDE, AVAILABLEmg/L .2NDNDischarge from steel/metal factories; discharge from plastic and fertilizer factories
Well 1FLORIDEmg/L 4NDNWater additive which promotes strong teeth; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum, factories
Well 2FLORIDEmg/L 4NDNWater additive which promotes strong teeth; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum, factories
Well 1IRONmg/L .3NDN 
Well 2IRONmg/L .3NDN 
Well 1MANGANESEmg/L .05NDN 
Well 2MANGANESEmg/L .05NDN 
Well 1SILVERmg/L .05NDN 
Well 2SILVERmg/L .05NDN 
Well 1CHLORIDEmg/L.8250 N 
Well 2CHLORIDEmg/L.9250 N 
Well 1SULFATEmg/L3.0250 N 
Well 2SULFATEmg/L3.7250 N 
Well 1ZINCmg/LND5.00 N 
Well 2ZINCmg/L0.01245.00 N 
Well 1SODIUMmg/L2.0  N 
Well 2SODIUMmg/L2.2  N 
Well 1HARDNESS AS CALCIUM CARBONATEmg/L53.5  N 
Well 2HARDNESS AS CALCIUM CARBONATEmg/L68.4  N 
Well 1ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITYuS/cm116700 N 
Well 2ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITYuS/cm145700 N 
Well 1TURBIDITYNTU.801 NSoil runoff
Well 2TURBIDITYNTU1.21 NSoil runoff
Well 1COLORColor Units 15NDN 
Well 2COLORColor Units 15NDN 
Well 1TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDSmg/L81500 N 
Well 2TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDSmg/L94500 N 
Well 1LEADmg/L .15NDNCorrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits
Well 2LEADmg/L .15NDNCorrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits
Well 1COPPERmg/L 1.3NDNCorrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits
Well 2COPPERmg/L0.00271.3 NCorrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits
Well 1RADIUM 228pCi/L 5NDNErosion of natural deposits
Well 2RADIUM 228pCi/L 5NDNErosion of natural deposits
Well 1GROSS ALPHApCi/L 15NDN 
Well 2GROSS ALPHApCi/L 15NDN 
Well 1GROSS BETApCi/L 50NDN 
Well 2GROSS BETApCi/L 50NDN 
Well 12,4 – Dug/L 70NDNRunoff from herbicide used on row crops
Well 22,4 – Dug/L 70NDNRunoff from herbicide used on row crops
Well 12,4,5-TP (SILVEX)ug/L 50NDNResidue of banned herbicide
Well 22,4,5-TP (SILVEX)ug/L 50NDNResidue of banned herbicide
Well 1PENTACHLOROPHENOLug/L 1NDNDischarge from wood-preserving factories
Well 2PENTACHLOROPHENOLug/L 1NDNDischarge from wood-preserving factories
Well 1DALAPONug/L 200NDNRunoff from herbicide used on rights of way
Well 2DALAPONug/L 200NDNRunoff from herbicide used on rights of way
Well 1DINOSEBug/L 7NDNRunoff from herbicide used on soybeans and vegetables
Well 2DINOSEBug/L 7NDNRunoff from herbicide used on soybeans and vegetables
Well 1PICLORAMug/L 500NDNHerbicide runoff
Well 2PICLORAMug/L 500NDNHerbicide runoff
Well 1DICAMBAug/L  NDN 
Well 2DICAMBAug/L  NDN 
Well 12,4 DBug/L  NDN 
Well 22,4 DBug/L  NDN 
Well 12,4,5 Tug/L  NDN 
Well 22,4,5 Tug/L  NDN 
Well 1BENTAZONug/L  NDN 
Well 2BENTAZONug/L  NDN 
Well 1DICHLORPROPug/L  NDN 
Well 2DICHLORPROPug/L  NDN 
Well 1ACIFLUORFENug/L  NDN 
Well 2ACIFLUORFENug/L  NDN 
Well 13,5 – DICHLOROBENZOIC ACIDug/L  NDN 
Well 23,5 – DICHLOROBENZOIC ACIDug/L   N 
Well 12,4 – DCAA (SURR) 93  N 
Well 22,4 – DCAA (SURR) 97  N 
Well 1TOTAL COLIFORM   NDNNaturally present in the environment
Well 2TOATL COLIFORM   NDNNaturally present in the environment
Well 1E. COLI   NDNHuman and animal fecal waste
Well 2E. COLI   NDNHuman and animal fecal waste

In addition to monitoring the quality of your water, The Town has been working to improve the overall water utility. In September of 2016 we were able to obtain an electronic meter reading system called Sensus. This system has allowed our Utilities Staff to read meters and process utility billings in a faster, more efficient manner. The maintenance team is still working diligently to replace all of the existing meters with these new radio read meters. There is a new look to our utility billing invoices. Letter size invoices replaced the old post card size billings.

Upcoming 2022-2023 water line projects will include Mountain Loop Highway, Trail Street and Darrington Street, Clear Creek Road, Elwell Avenue and Commercial Avenue. These water line projects not only replaced old and/or worn-out water lines, they also included adding and upgrading fire hydrants for added fire protection. The water leakage percentage for 2021 was 6.3%. With a three year average of 5.0% Replacing and upgrading our water line system has steadily decreased this percentage year after year. On October 8, 2019 the Town of Darrington hired Utility Services Associates to do a Water Distribution System Leak Detection on the Town’s entire mainline water system. The results were outstanding, finding only one minor leak, which was quickly and easily repaired.

The Town’s two water reservoir tanks were inspected and cleaned in 2020. The inspection found both tanks in excellent working order. As required by law, the tanks will again be inspected and cleaned in 2025.

The Town Water Utility Department provides safe, clean drinking water and is able to ensure the availability of water to all Town residents. A sanitary survey is conducted by the Washington State Department of Health and the results of the Public Works crew’s efforts in water maintenance, water sampling and recordkeeping have been resoundingly approved.   

Drinking Water and Novel Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) COVID-19 is a respiratory disease caused by a new, or “novel” coronavirus. COVID-19 is short for Coronavirus Disease 2019. Washington State is currently experiencing a COVID-19 outbreak.

COVID-19 has not been detected in drinking water. The Office of Drinking Water at the Washington State Department of Health and public water system operators work every day to protect public water supplies from bacteriological and viral contamination.

Drinking water regulations use a multi-barrier approach to ensure safe and reliable drinking water. They are intended to protect your water in three ways:

             · Source water protection: Water utilities obtain their drinking water from the best quality and most protected             sources available. This reduces or removes the risk of contamination from entering the water system in the first             place.

            · Treatment: When necessary, water utilities use filtration and/or disinfection with chlorine to treat your drinking           water. Chlorine is very effective in killing coronaviruses. COVID-19 is a coronavirus and we believe chlorine will     be effective in killing COVID-19 as well.

            · Monitoring: Water utilities collect water samples at least monthly. If contamination is found, the regulations             require utilities to notify the public and recommend steps they can take to ensure their safety.

Have more questions about COVID-19? Call the hotline: 1-800-525-0127. For interpretative services, press # when they answer and say your language. (Open from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.) For questions about your own health, COVID-19 testing, or testing results, please contact your health care provider.

If you have any questions about this report or anything concerning your water utility, please contact Dianne Allen, Clerk/Treasurer, at (360) 436-1131. We want our valued customers and community to be informed about their water utility, because informed customers are our best allies.  If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled Town Council meetings. They are held on the 2nd Wednesday of each month at 7:00pm located at Town Hall, 1005 Cascade Street, Darrington.

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